3 Techniques to Maximise Your Time Management

Minute by minute, hour by hour, how effective are you really at getting items ticked off your to-do list? Some of us might find that it’s easier to get certain tasks done in the morning, with the rest of the day spent on planning and meetings. Others might prefer to get meetings and planning out of the way first before getting stuck into a to-do list. Either way, life happens and it can be difficult to manage our time effectively if we don’t have some kind of plan. To structure your work schedule, and allow for unexpected interruptions, here are three time management techniques that can assist in getting the most out of your day: 1. Pomodoro Technique Brainchild of Italian entrepreneur, Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is named after a tomato-shaped kitchen timer that he used to time his work schedule during university. A very simple technique, it allows you to be more productive by timing shorter but more frequent bouts of undistracted work, ideally twenty-five minutes, with short breaks in between. Each unit of undistracted work time is called a “pomodoro”, and after every four to five pomodoros (or pomodori to be precise), you can take a longer break. While the number of pomodoros done each day depends entirely on your schedule, this method allows you to fit more focused time into your schedule, whilst making sure that you take regular breaks, which further enhances your ability to accomplish more during the course of a given day. 2. Getting Things Done (GTD) David Allen developed the Getting Things Done (GTD) method as a time management method that...

The Future of Work: What Will Change?

As we continue to work harder and find more productive ways to achieve our goals, how are our workspaces going to evolve in relation to this? We all know that technological developments are changing the way we work as well as the tools at our disposal. There will no doubt also be physical changes that will take place to accommodate or counteract all the technological developments in our working environments. To get an idea of just some of the ways our workplaces are set to change, here are just five approaches to the future of work: 1. Incorporating Nature While we may be heading towards a world of densely populated cities and interconnected digital devices, that’s not to say that nature will not play an important role in the future of work. Something as simple as an office plant is used daily to invigorate a dull space, but nature is also being incorporated into the workplace on a greater through the implementation of biophilic design. This approach to interior and exterior design incorporates natural elements into all aspects of a workplace, from surfaces to building material, all of which has a profound effect on our sense of wellbeing. 2. Interactive Technology A recent video from software behemoth Microsoft delves into what the future of technology might look like. From holograms to interactive screens, the process of working and sharing information is shown to be as simple as swiping a finger. While touchscreens may be a relatively new introduction in the greater scheme of things, the fact that we’ve become so accustomed to them in relatively short space of time...

Robots in the Workplace: Scary or Helpful?

When it comes to new technology and the thought of robots completing automated tasks in the workplace, an instinctive reaction is to be scared that these robots will take over from people. While there is research to suggest that increased automation can increase productivity and actually create jobs, the thought of robots in the workplace can still be an intimidating idea. While we all might be aware of the potential of robots to perform helpful tasks, what robots are currently being used in the workplace? We investigate four of the many being used and tested at the moment: 1. Medical Robots A machine might never be able to offer the same knowledge and bedside manner to a patient as a trained doctor, but robots in various forms are being used in the medical profession to facilitate learning and consulting with patients. From remote key-hole surgery to dentistry dummies that react appropriately to certain procedures, robots are helping medical professionals to refine their skills, and are giving them the tools to operate and examine patients remotely. Within hospitals, there have also been various robots developed to perform routine tasks like delivering clean linen, medicine and other supplies, as well as being able to operate elevators, open doors and avoid obstacles. Functioning on a more stationary level, there are also robots which have been designed to be stand-in as nurses or carers for the elderly, reminding them to take their medicines and to helping them to get in touch with a doctor when they are feeling ill. 2. Manufacturing Robots While machines are already an essential element of manufacturing, the use...

5 Tips for Dealing with Time Zones in the Workplace

In today’s global work environment, we often have to adjust our work schedules to fit in with different time zones. It can be a serious challenge to adjust our body clocks as we continue to travel internationally for work, as well as having to deal with colleagues both ahead of and behind us in time. While there are many different ways to cope with time zone differences, here are five tips to consider when working with people from various corners of the globe: 1. Maintain Regular Check-Ins While it can be difficult to enforce an exact time at which all concerned are available, scheduling a regular check-in can help to keep everyone on the same page. Collaborative platforms allow for easy task assignment regardless of time zone, but connecting in the same time and space, even digitally, can go a long way in ensuring that there is a consistent workflow. This can require a lot of forward planning but with a variety of digital tools to facilitate cross-continent communication, it’s really just a matter of making the time to connect. 2. Stay Connected Keeping everyone on the team connected, regardless of the platform, is essential to breaking down any potential barriers caused by distance. Being aware of everyone else’s time zone, and work preferences, can also prevent anyone from having to wake up at 2am on the other side of the world to deal with a crisis. WhatsApp and Telegram groups, for example, are a very easy way to keep a large number of people in the know, although it does help to have a clear focus for each...

Colour Psychology in the Workplace

We’re all affected by colour on some level, from the tint of our office walls to the clothes we choose to wear every day. Bolder primary colours make a more powerful impact on our conscious mind, but what about the other shades of the spectrum? From slick black corporate suits to bold red lipstick, how do the colours around us affect the way we work and interact, and what is the science behind it? Here are four considerations of colour psychology and how it can be applied to the modern workspace: 1. Bolder colours make a statement If we look at their psychological associations, colours have different effects on us depending on the way we actually process the colour physiologically. For example, bright red is the longest wavelength, and is associated with power, emotions and even aggression. Red in the workplace can also make a bold statement, such as the entrance to The New Yorker magazine’s head office in New York City, which emphasizes the publication’s status as an important cultural institution. Coca-Cola’s office in London also celebrates the qualities of the famous brand with the use of red in their workspace, often interspersed with white to ease the intensity. 2. Colours affects affect our mood and thinking While we might not always understand why, colours affect us on a physical level, sometimes just don’t resonate with us on certain days. Psychologically, blue is associated with calmness, serenity and clear communication, but can also be perceived as aloof and unfriendly. When it comes to enhancing elements of a workspace, the use of a variety of colours can have a...