The Future of Jobs: What Roles Will Last?

With the marketplace evolving at a rapid rate, access to digital technology is re-evaluating the need for certain jobs. The truth is that technology has been evolving for centuries to meet changing human needs, but it’s the rate at which certain skills are becoming redundant in an ever-competitive marketplace that is of concern from an economic perspective. While the traditional concept of a job might become obsolete in itself, here are some of the professions that are becoming less and less prominent as the future of jobs continues to shift: 1. Clerical Work In a traditional office or business setup, there are people assigned to certain roles such as answering the phone, managing inventory, compiling sales data or typing out documents. While there may always be a need for someone to be available to talk to customers on request, advances in technology means that often several clerical tasks can be integrated into a single software platform. Software such as Salesforce for example combines clerical tasks such as quoting and managing other administrative tasks with the use of additional applications, which means that theoretically one person could perform the tasks of an entire small-business office. 2. Call Centre Agents The growth of text-based applications such as Whatsapp, Skype and even online chat means that often there is no need to talk to someone directly when making a sales transaction. While it might still be necessary on occasion to talk to someone directly to resolve a problem, the thought of being put on hold with a ridiculous tone playing in your ear is making text-based troubleshooting much more feasible and convenient....

The Future of Work: What Will Change?

As we continue to work harder and find more productive ways to achieve our goals, how are our workspaces going to evolve in relation to this? We all know that technological developments are changing the way we work as well as the tools at our disposal. There will no doubt also be physical changes that will take place to accommodate or counteract all the technological developments in our working environments. To get an idea of just some of the ways our workplaces are set to change, here are just five approaches to the future of work: 1. Incorporating Nature While we may be heading towards a world of densely populated cities and interconnected digital devices, that’s not to say that nature will not play an important role in the future of work. Something as simple as an office plant is used daily to invigorate a dull space, but nature is also being incorporated into the workplace on a greater through the implementation of biophilic design. This approach to interior and exterior design incorporates natural elements into all aspects of a workplace, from surfaces to building material, all of which has a profound effect on our sense of wellbeing. 2. Interactive Technology A recent video from software behemoth Microsoft delves into what the future of technology might look like. From holograms to interactive screens, the process of working and sharing information is shown to be as simple as swiping a finger. While touchscreens may be a relatively new introduction in the greater scheme of things, the fact that we’ve become so accustomed to them in relatively short space of time...

Robots in the Workplace: Scary or Helpful?

When it comes to new technology and the thought of robots completing automated tasks in the workplace, an instinctive reaction is to be scared that these robots will take over from people. While there is research to suggest that increased automation can increase productivity and actually create jobs, the thought of robots in the workplace can still be an intimidating idea. While we all might be aware of the potential of robots to perform helpful tasks, what robots are currently being used in the workplace? We investigate four of the many being used and tested at the moment: 1. Medical Robots A machine might never be able to offer the same knowledge and bedside manner to a patient as a trained doctor, but robots in various forms are being used in the medical profession to facilitate learning and consulting with patients. From remote key-hole surgery to dentistry dummies that react appropriately to certain procedures, robots are helping medical professionals to refine their skills, and are giving them the tools to operate and examine patients remotely. Within hospitals, there have also been various robots developed to perform routine tasks like delivering clean linen, medicine and other supplies, as well as being able to operate elevators, open doors and avoid obstacles. Functioning on a more stationary level, there are also robots which have been designed to be stand-in as nurses or carers for the elderly, reminding them to take their medicines and to helping them to get in touch with a doctor when they are feeling ill. 2. Manufacturing Robots While machines are already an essential element of manufacturing, the use...

Colour Psychology in the Workplace

We’re all affected by colour on some level, from the tint of our office walls to the clothes we choose to wear every day. Bolder primary colours make a more powerful impact on our conscious mind, but what about the other shades of the spectrum? From slick black corporate suits to bold red lipstick, how do the colours around us affect the way we work and interact, and what is the science behind it? Here are four considerations of colour psychology and how it can be applied to the modern workspace: 1. Bolder colours make a statement If we look at their psychological associations, colours have different effects on us depending on the way we actually process the colour physiologically. For example, bright red is the longest wavelength, and is associated with power, emotions and even aggression. Red in the workplace can also make a bold statement, such as the entrance to The New Yorker magazine’s head office in New York City, which emphasizes the publication’s status as an important cultural institution. Coca-Cola’s office in London also celebrates the qualities of the famous brand with the use of red in their workspace, often interspersed with white to ease the intensity. 2. Colours affects affect our mood and thinking While we might not always understand why, colours affect us on a physical level, sometimes just don’t resonate with us on certain days. Psychologically, blue is associated with calmness, serenity and clear communication, but can also be perceived as aloof and unfriendly. When it comes to enhancing elements of a workspace, the use of a variety of colours can have a...

Deskbound: Dealing With and Preventing Chronic Pain

We all know what it’s like to work behind a desk all day. After staring at a screen for a while, we get completely absorbed in what we’re doing and become oblivious to the fact that we’re slouching and sticking our necks out. Attractive or what?! Whilst stand-up desks and ergonomics have gone a long way to improving the way we work at a computer, many people still struggle with the latent injuries that come with sitting. Here are five ways to deal with, and prevent the chronic pain that comes with being desk-bound: 1. Be Aware of How You Sit Holding any position for extended periods can have painful consequences, so it’s important to be aware of the way you’re sitting. Ironically, according to physiotherapist Megan van Schoor from Samantha Dunbar Physiotherapy, many people actually try to sit up too straight, which can also cause problems. Some companies have trained physiotherapists that will help you to set up your desk correctly, but even just having an awareness of your posture can help to prevent what is known as work related upper limb disorder. 2. Be Aware of When You Sit Sitting for extended periods in an incorrect position can cause problems. Even being at a standing desk all day can be problematic if you aren’t standing correctly. Be aware of taking regular breaks to walk around, and work on strengthening your stabilising muscles to prevent unnecessary injury. Exercise such as Pilates can help to strengthen your core muscles, which play an important role in keeping your body aligned and stable. Breaking up your day into alternating periods of...

The Benefits of Co-Working Spaces

All over the world, freelancers and entrepreneurs are creating co-working spaces in order to make the most of shared resources and establish a sense of community for those working independently in professions that can be quite isolating. While co-working spaces might differ in size, aesthetic and concept, the essence of a shared work environment remains the same: to have access to an environment where work is meaningful and collaborative, autonomy is celebrated and where interaction and network is refreshingly authentic. Would it work for you? Here are some of the benefits of working in a shared working space. Shared Resources One of the advantages of working in a shared working space is that all resources are communal. For example, in some countries around the world, the price of a fast internet connection might be expensive for a single entrepreneur to take on alone, but in a shared working environment, this cost can be lowered significantly when divided between other members. Even sharing other kinds of resources like coffee and a kitchen counter can provide an additional sense of interconnectedness that can lead to new conversations and lower overheads. Sociability For those who work independently but do enjoy interacting with others, a co-working environment can provide a welcome social element in a day mostly spent staring at a screen. Many co-working spaces are also proactive about organising events and establishing a sense of community, which can be beneficial for those looking for both social interaction and networking opportunities. These aren’t enforced but a good way to collaborate and share inspiration. Diversity While diversity is inevitable in our multicultural world, in...